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Explore the seasons.

New England offers the gift of four distinct seasons, and The Deacon is an ideal place to experience them. Welcome the vibrant rush of spring. The bright skies of summer. The mellow days of fall and the hush of winter.With our curated recommendations, we’ll help you get the most out of your visit. Or choose to just relax. The choice is yours.

 
 
 
 

AUTUMN 2019

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Fall is the season of the arts.

Seven stage productions, from Cabaret to A Christmas Carol, are being staged among four nearby theaters - the nearest a five minute walk from the Deacon, the furthest a short 15 minute drive away - give you several options. Or how about live music? Cultural arts center The Kate (5 min away) presents 32 acts, from George Winston to The Box Tops. and art films shown on the Kate’s big screen. There are art exhibits at nearby Lyme Arts Academy. Or experience the art of nature with a guided butterfly walk at a nearby nature preserve.

 
 

Winter 2019

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The holidays in New England.

Drinking a mug of hot chocolate fireside. Taking a walk on a bright brisk December morning on sparkling snow. Snowflakes swirling in the half-light of dusk. New England and the holidays go hand in glove, and The Deacon is the ideal place to experience it all. Consider a candlelight Christmas eve service in one of the area’s antique churches. Or just stick close to home with a good book.

 
 

SPRING 2020

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Spring awakening.

The days are (finally) getting longer, and the birds are singing in the trees. It’s a perfect time to visit The Deacon. The whole New England coastline shakes off the muted days of winter. And a host of activities await.

 
 

Summer 2020

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Summer excitement.

Everything is in full swing now. All the New England beach towns are hopping, and Old Saybrook (home of The Deacon) is no exception.

 
 

Excursions

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Nearby…and worth seeing.

 
 
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Essex (9 min. drive)

Picture-perfect New England streets. And a wine bar rated by Wine Spectator as one of the top 100 in the country. The Essex Steam Train & Riverboat's 2½-hour journey begins at the historic 1892 Essex Station for a 12-mile, narrated round-trip into the heart of the unspoiled Connecticut River Valley - designated "one of the last great places on earth" by the Nature Conservancy.

 
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Old Lyme (8 min. drive)

Situated on the mouth of the Connecticut River (across the river from Old Saybrook) where it empties in Long Island Sound, Lyme was established in 1665. The town has long been a popular summer resort and artists' colony. The Florence Griswold House (now a museum) in Old Lyme housed an art colony for many years in the early 20th century to many prominent American Impressionist painters. The building of the Old Lyme Congregational Church is known for the many paintings that have been made of it, most notably by Childe Hassam.

 
 
 
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Chester (15 min. drive)

Settled in 1692, Chester is a small rural town that has grown and adapted since its historic beginnings as a shipbuilding and mill town . In the intimate and walkable village center you will find a surprising collection of shops and galleries. The town is a magnet for artists, artisans, actors, designers, photographers, chefs, and dynamic entrepreneurs. Chester has 11 restaurants from which to choose. Back in 1769, Jonathan Warner was granted permission to operate a ferry across the Connecticut River that became the Chester-Hadlyme Ferry, the second-oldest continuously operating ferry service in Connecticut. In the summer months, the ferry service makes for a short (10 min) but fun and scenic ride.

 
 

Excursions

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Come aboard…

 
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to explore the Connecticut River Valley, designated as one of the “Last Great” places on Earth by the Nature Conservancy

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Essex (9 min. drive)

Picture-perfect New England streets. And a wine bar rated by Wine Spectator as one of the top 100 in the country. The Essex Steam Train & Riverboat's 2½-hour journey begins at the historic 1892 Essex Station for a 12-mile, narrated round-trip into the heart of the unspoiled Connecticut River Valley - designated "one of the last great places on earth" by the Nature Conservancy.

 
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Old Lyme (8 min. drive)

Situated on the mouth of the Connecticut River (across the river from Old Saybrook) where it empties in Long Island Sound, Lyme was established in 1665. The town has long been a popular summer resort and artists' colony. The Florence Griswold House (now a museum) in Old Lyme housed an art colony for many years in the early 20th century to many prominent American Impressionist painters. The building of the Old Lyme Congregational Church is known for the many paintings that have been made of it, most notably by Childe Hassam.

 
 
 
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Chester (15 min. drive)

Settled in 1692, Chester is a small rural town that has grown and adapted since its historic beginnings as a shipbuilding and mill town . In the intimate and walkable village center you will find a surprising collection of shops and galleries. The town is a magnet for artists, artisans, actors, designers, photographers, chefs, and dynamic entrepreneurs. Chester has 11 restaurants from which to choose. Back in 1769, Jonathan Warner was granted permission to operate a ferry across the Connecticut River that became the Chester-Hadlyme Ferry, the second-oldest continuously operating ferry service in Connecticut. In the summer months, the ferry service makes for a short (10 min) but fun and scenic ride.

 
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